MicroMedicine http://journals.tmkarpinski.com/index.php/mmed <p><strong>ISSN 2449-8947</strong><br><strong><a title="MNiSW points: 8" href="http://www.nauka.gov.pl/g2/oryginal/2016_12/c5c2fcb0c283a9eb3d1081020fd3178c.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">MNiSW points 2016: 8</a></strong><br><a title="ICV: 86.27" href="http://journals.indexcopernicus.com/MicroMedicine,p24783445,3.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><strong>ICV 2015: 86.27</strong></a></p> TMKarpinski Publisher en-US MicroMedicine 2449-8947 Probiotics in colon cancer prevention http://journals.tmkarpinski.com/index.php/mmed/article/view/50 <p>Probiotics are live, selected microbial strains that have a beneficial effect on the human body and when introduced into the body, they colonize in the digestive tract, especially in the large intestine, exerting a beneficial effect on the health of the host. The microbial strains, so that they can be included in the probiotics, must be thoroughly tested and meet several conditions. These microorganisms multiply in the gastrointestinal tract and are competitive for pathogenic microorganisms that cause infection. Probiotic bacteria are found in natural yogurts, sour milk, sauerkraut, pickled cucumbers. Many studies show a positive correlation between the consumption of probiotics and the risk of developing certain cancers. Probiotics are most likely to reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer.</p> <p><strong>DOI:</strong> <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1297660">http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1297660</a></p> Marlena Wolek Anna Bogacz Bogna Juskowiak Anna Polaszewska Bogusław Czerny ##submission.copyrightStatement## http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2018-06-25 2018-06-25 6 2 62 68 Effect of Aloe vera gel on some haematological parameters and serum electrolytes in high salt loaded Wistar rats http://journals.tmkarpinski.com/index.php/mmed/article/view/43 <p>This study investigated the effect of <em>Aloe vera</em> gel on some haematological parameters and serum electrolytes in high salt loaded rats. Twenty (20) male Wistar rats (180-250 g) were randomly assigned into 4 groups (n=5): Control- received 0.2 ml normal saline; <em>Aloe</em>-received 600 mg/kg of <em>Aloe vera</em> gel orally once daily; Salt-fed (SF) received high salt diet (8% NaCl in feed + 1% NaCl in H<sub>2</sub>O); Saltfed-treated (SF+<em>Aloe</em>) received high salt diet + <em>Aloe vera</em> gel. All groups had access to rat feed and water throughout the duration (six weeks) of treatment. Blood samples were collected from each animal via cardiac puncture for analysis. Red blood cell (RBC) count, haemoglobin (Hb) concentration and packed cell volume (PCV) were significantly (p&lt;0.05) increased in SF and SF+<em>Aloe</em> groups compared with control and <em>Aloe</em> groups. Total white blood cell count was significantly (p&lt;0.001) decreased in SF group compared with control and <em>Aloe</em> groups and increased (p&lt;0.001) in SF+<em>Aloe</em> group compared with SF group. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts were significantly increased and decreased respectively in SF+<em>Aloe</em> group compared with control (p&lt;0.01), <em>Aloe</em> (p&lt;0.05) and SF (p&lt;0.001) groups. Na<sup>+</sup>, K<sup>+</sup> and Cl<sup>-</sup> concentrations were significantly increased in SF and SF+<em>Aloe</em> group compared with control and <em>Aloe</em> groups. HCO<sub>3</sub><sup>-</sup> concentration was significantly increased in <em>Aloe</em> and SF+<em>Aloe</em> groups compared with control. High salt diet (HSD) caused alterations in red cell indices and posed threat to the immune system of rats. <em>Aloe vera</em> could not reverse these alterations but exhibited an immune-stimulatory effect. Both <em>Aloe vera</em> and HSD caused electrolyte imbalance.</p> <p><strong>DOI:</strong> <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1318287">http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1318287</a></p> Augustine Lishilinimye Udefa Archibong Nsa Archibong Ada Ak Akwari Solomon Ayaokpo Leilei ##submission.copyrightStatement## http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2018-07-20 2018-07-20 6 2 69 77 Isolation of Enterobacteriaceae and non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli (NFGNB) from Dental Unit Water Lines (DUWL) in a tertiary care institutional setup http://journals.tmkarpinski.com/index.php/mmed/article/view/38 <p><em>Background: </em>The quality of dental unit water lines (DUWL) is of considerable importance since patients and dental staff are regularly exposed to water and aerosols generated from dental units which thereby influence the individual patient outcome and health-care associated morbidity. The aim of the present study was to determine the microbiological quality of water used, presence of biofilms and also the potential of isolated bacterial species in producing biofilms within DUWL.</p> <p><em>Methods:</em> Thirty DUWL samples were collected from various departments of Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore. Bacteriological analysis was done for the presence of various bacterial contaminants. Presence of biofilms on DUWLs and potential of bacterial isolates to form biofilm were also determined.</p> <p><em>Results:</em> Seven of 30 samples (23.3%), were found to be of unsatisfactory quality (coliform count &gt; 200 CFU/ml), most frequently from air/water syringes. A total of 45 strains were isolated from 14 water samples. Genera isolated were <em>Escherichia</em> spp., <em>Enterobacter</em> spp., <em>Klebsiella</em> spp., <em>Pseudomonas</em> spp. and <em>Acinetobacter</em> spp. Four of 10 samples from DUWL tubing showed presence of biofilms (40%), formed mostly by <em>Acinetobacter</em> spp. and <em>Pseudomonas</em> spp. Out of 45 strains that were isolated, 19 strains displayed ability to form biofilms. Maximum number (10) isolates formed biofilms with 48 hours.</p> <p><em>Conclusion:</em> Exposure to contaminated water from DUWL poses threat to the well-being of the patient and the health care personnel as well. Hence, measures should be initiated to ensure the optimum quality of DUWL water.</p> <p><strong>DOI:</strong> <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1319772">http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1319772</a></p> A. Ebinesh Harshitha J. Naik - Shobha K. Vishwas Saralaya ##submission.copyrightStatement## http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2018-07-23 2018-07-23 6 2 78 84